Health December 2011

The latest healthcare options for your clan's well-being.

Alanna Weissman

Squeaky Clean
The all-purpose Liquid Sunshine cleanser by Vermont Soapworks is not only for cleaning around the house. The organic, nontoxic liquid soap is safe enough to be used directly on the skin and hair of children and pets. Also eco-friendly and hypoallergenic, the cleanser is suitable for the most sensitive of skin and can be used to clean any water-safe surface. Liquid Sunshine is sold in four sizes at www.vermontsoap.com.

Vita-Yum
Enriching kids’ diets with 13 needed nutrients is pediatrician-approved SmartyPants Vitamins, which double as great-tasting gummies. For every bottle you buy, SmartyPants makes a donation to Vitamin Angels, a charity that helps expectant mothers and babies worldwide to get essential nutrition. Purchase the vitamins by logging onto www.wearesmartypants.com and learn more about Vitamin Angels at www.vitaminangels.org.

Hot Stuff
Cook safely and efficiently with Xtrema by Ceramcor’s Flair skillet. Made in two ceramic sizes, the nonstick pan is a cinch to clean, environmentally friendly and free of Teflon, a common chemical used in nonstick cookware that has been linked to cancer. The Flair’s glazed surface is scratch-resistant and can withstand temperatures more than five times higher than conventional non-ceramic skillets. Get cooking at www.ceramcor.com.

Green Machine
Created by a concerned grandfather, Little Green offers hypoallergenic bath and body products for tots and tykes that are free of parabens and sulfates. The line of gentle, tear-free formulas includes shampoo, conditioner, hair detangler, body wash and body lotion. Find stores that carry Little Green at www.littlegreencares.com or purchase online at www.brightonbeautysupply.com.

Go Bananas
Create your own vegan, guilt-free frozen desserts with the Yonanas Maker. The affordable machine whips up treats made of bananas but that taste like soft-serve ice cream. Add in flavoring from fruits, nuts and chocolates of your choice. This is a delicious way to sneak more fruit into your family’s diet. The dishwasher-safe Yonanas Maker is available online at www.yonanas.com and at retail stores, such as Target, Sears and Bed Bath & Beyond.

Magnificent Monitor
The Withings Smart Baby Monitor isn’t your ordinary monitor. The innovative product features a camera with night vision and infrared capabilities. It also streams video to any Internet-connected screen, including an iPhone, eBook reader or LCD-TV. In addition, the device tracks baby’s movements and cries, as well as the room’s temperature, humidity and decibel levels. For further details about the high-tech monitor, go to www.withings.com.

Clowning Around
Say goodbye to boring workouts and hello to JuggleFit DVDs. The videos come in beginner and intermediate levels, the former of which is sold with a set of juggling scarves. The series uses entertaining juggling workouts to tone arms and the core while improving coordination. Bring a bit of the circus into your living room to get fit at www.jugglefit.com.

Raising the Bar
Vegan, soy-free and organic, 22 Days Nutrition and Protein bars are designed around the premise that it takes the human mind roughly three weeks to adjust to a major lifestyle change. Thereby helping to instill healthy habits, the bars are sold in an array of flavors and formulations to meet any health-conscious need. Flavors include Nut Butter Buddha Crunch, Goji Maté Firecracker, Fruit Nut Karma, Enlightened Pumpkinseed, Cherry Chocolate Bliss and Daily Mocha Mantra. Take the 22 Days challenge at www.22daysnutrition.com.

Baby Bumblebee
Not only are Zarbee’s over-the-counter cough and cold products effective and all natural, they also taste great, meaning no more fights over getting your kids to take medicine. A favorite for curbing children’s coughs, Zarbee’s All Natural Children’s Cough Syrup in Cherry soothes sore throats and boosts the immunity of children ages 12 months and older. For more on warding off kids’ coughs and colds, log onto www.zarbees.com.

This column appeared in the December 2011 issue.